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Coble Boat Builder
REES, David Morgan
Coble Boat Builder
1970's
Yorkshire
 
Caption
The coble used to be the mainstay of the inshore fishing industry off Yorkshire's north-east coast. A coble is built from experience, from knowing exactly what the fisherman wants. There is no such thing as a set of plans. A coble is clinker-built. This means the external planks overlap each other and are fastened together with clinched copper nails.
Display Creator
REES, David Morgan
Creation Date
1970's
Location
Yorkshire
Coble Boat Builder
REES, David Morgan
Coble Boat Builder
1970's
Yorkshire
 
Caption
Billy Clarkson of Whitby looking at the shape and form of a coble during construction. The boat's design makes for maximum seaworthiness.
Display Creator
REES, David Morgan
Creation Date
1970's
Location
Yorkshire
Ship's figure-head carver
REES, David Morgan
Ship's figure-head carv...
1970's
Yorkshire
 
Caption
Trevor Ellis carved and painted a series of ship's figureheads from pine in the small Coverdale village of Horsehouses. He supplied these to yaht clubs throughout Britain.
Display Creator
REES, David Morgan
Creation Date
1970's
Location
Yorkshire
Ship's figure-head carver
REES, David Morgan
Ship's figure-head carv...
1970's
Yorkshire
 
Caption
Figure heads have been in use on ships since pre-Christian times. Here Trevor Ellis shapes a new figurehead.
Display Creator
REES, David Morgan
Creation Date
1970's
Location
Yorkshire
Village Builder
REES, David Morgan
Village Builder
1970's
Yorkshire
 
Caption
Yorkshire dales villages have a solidarity and visual unity which has been dictated by the materials available locally. Stone masons were content to repeat their simple methods in traditional materials because they knew they were good and proof against the savagery of the Northern elements. Bob Guy of the Reeth builders, Blenkiron & Co. using a slater's hammer to cut a stone roof slate to size.
Display Creator
REES, David Morgan
Creation Date
1970's
Location
Yorkshire
Village Builder
REES, David Morgan
Village Builder
1970's
Yorkshire
 
Caption
The old method of fixing roof slates was with wood pegs. Today alloy nails are used.
Display Creator
REES, David Morgan
Creation Date
1970's
Location
Yorkshire
Thatcher
REES, David Morgan
Thatcher
1970's
Yorkshire
 
Caption
Before stone or slate or tile, thatch was the universal roof covering throughout Yorkshire. Sometimes on an old cottage you may see the ghostly traces of the former type of roof. The pitch of a thatched roof has to be much steeper to allow the rain to flow off quickly. A 'spit' of hazel secures the 'yealmes' of straw and iron bodkins stitch the straw to the frame of the roof with twine.
Display Creator
REES, David Morgan
Creation Date
1970's
Location
Yorkshire
Thatcher
REES, David Morgan
Thatcher
1970's
Yorkshire
 
Caption
Seth Eccles of Helmsley working with thatch in the traditional way.
Display Creator
REES, David Morgan
Creation Date
1970's
Location
Yorkshire
Thatcher
REES, David Morgan
Thatcher
1970's
Yorkshire
 
Caption
A thatcher carrying his materials in the traditional way.
Display Creator
REES, David Morgan
Creation Date
1970's
Location
Yorkshire
Knife blade grinder
REES, David Morgan
Knife blade grinder
1970's
Yorkshire
 
Caption
The 'little mesters' who still exist in Sheffield with surprising resilience, despite the formidable difficulties facing the cutlery trade because of fierce foriegn competition, are the successors of workers in Nineteenth century independent cottage industries. The Grinders in the Sheffield cutlery trade form an important bridge between the hand blade forgers and the cutlers who fit the knives together. There is still constant demand for the specialised item, for that extra quality of craftsmanship.
Display Creator
REES, David Morgan
Creation Date
1970's
Location
Yorkshire
Penknife cutler
REES, David Morgan
Penknife cutler
1970's
Yorkshire
 
Caption
Close-up of a fully equipped penknife with each of the tools being hand made by Eric Wragg before the knife is assembled.
Display Creator
REES, David Morgan
Creation Date
1970's
Location
Yorkshire
Horn cutters
REES, David Morgan
Horn cutters
1970's
Yorkshire
 
Caption
The horn trade grew alongside the cutlery trade in suplying it with material for knife handles and 'scales' or coverings for pen and pocket knives. English oxen and cattle would have provided Sheffield craftsmen with horn even in Chaucer's day. Bernard Whiting and Harry Scarlett, formerly of Rocking Street, Sheffield were the last of the industry's horn cutters in the city. Their raw materials would include two types of buffalo horn.
Display Creator
REES, David Morgan
Creation Date
1970's
Location
Yorkshire
Horn cutters
REES, David Morgan
Horn cutters
1970's
Yorkshire
 
Caption
Harry Scarlett holds a knife fitted with a deer horn handle
Display Creator
REES, David Morgan
Creation Date
1970's
Location
Yorkshire
Handloom weaver
REES, David Morgan
Handloom weaver
1970's
Yorkshire
 
Caption
Hand loom weaving has moved from being an integral part of the Yorkshire woollen industry to an activity which is pursued by dedicated amateurs as a pastime. Keith and Margaret Brier were survivors of the earlier domestic way of working. They worked from their home in Upperthong which was a typical setting for the cottage industry of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries when whole families spun, wove and still farmed. Margaret Brier of Upperthong near Holmfirth at work on a tappit hand loom weaving a sample length of woollen cloth.
Display Creator
REES, David Morgan
Creation Date
1970's
Location
Yorkshire
Handloom weaver
REES, David Morgan
Handloom weaver
1970's
Yorkshire
 
Caption
Keith Brier preparing the warp on a warping frame for his hand loom.
Display Creator
REES, David Morgan
Creation Date
1970's
Location
Yorkshire
Knitter
REES, David Morgan
Knitter
1970's
Yorkshire
 
Caption
Woollen garments for sailors and fishermen came to replace sealskin clothing as seals became harder to obtain around the coast of Britain. The style and terminology for these knitted garments seems to have originated in the Channel Islands. "Ganseys" or "guernseys" were customarily made from thick heavy dark blue wool, jerseys from lighter, thinner yarns and a wider variety of colours. Mrs Ethel Richardson of Old Whitby, a fisherman's wife, using the traditional four needles to knit a "gansey"
Display Creator
REES, David Morgan
Creation Date
1970's
Location
Yorkshire
Lacemaker
REES, David Morgan
Lacemaker
1970's
Yorkshire
 
Caption
Essentially a cottage industry to provide a little extra money for families, lacemaking has always been at the mercy of either fashion or competition from the Continent or from machines. Mrs Florence Longman of Wombleton near Helmsley making a 'pillow' lace.
Display Creator
REES, David Morgan
Creation Date
1970's
Location
Yorkshire
Lacemaker
REES, David Morgan
Lacemaker
1970's
Yorkshire
 
Caption
Close-up of the lace pattern as it develops on the 'pillow' with threads of linen yarn running from the bobbins to the pins holding the stitches in place. The complexity of the pattern is decided by the number of bobbins.
Display Creator
REES, David Morgan
Creation Date
1970's
Location
Yorkshire
Quilter
REES, David Morgan
Quilter
1970's
Yorkshire
 
Caption
Plain quilts consisting of sheets of whole cloth sandwiching an inner layer of wadding, with the decoration being provided by the stitching were popular in the Swaledale area of Yorkshire. It is thought to be a much earlier craft than the patchwork style which only emerged as more fanciful designs of woven textiles became more widely available. Miss Annie Pickard of Kirkbymoorside with her patchwork quilt containing over three thousand hexagonal patches of different print material, made on a wooden frame in her front parlour.
Display Creator
REES, David Morgan
Creation Date
1970's
Location
Yorkshire
Furniture maker
REES, David Morgan
Furniture maker
1970's
Yorkshire
 
Caption
The local furniture maker would be called upon to make all manner of things from farm implements to coffins. The majority of his customers would call on his skills for simple serviceable furniture, mainly in oak. The use of locally-grown materials, usually oak or ash or walnut has given a natural appearance to their work which was a result of sympathy with the wood itself as well as an understanding of the needs of the user.
Display Creator
REES, David Morgan
Creation Date
1970's
Location
Yorkshire
Furniture maker
REES, David Morgan
Furniture maker
1970's
Yorkshire
 
Caption
Using an adaze to fashion the surface of a piece of oak
Display Creator
REES, David Morgan
Creation Date
1970's
Location
Yorkshire
Furniture maker
REES, David Morgan
Furniture maker
1970's
Yorkshire
 
Caption
Wilf Hutchinson, furniture maker of Husthwaite North Yorkshire, putting his trade mark squirrel on an oak sideboard.
Display Creator
REES, David Morgan
Creation Date
1970's
Location
Yorkshire
Windsor chair maker
REES, David Morgan
Windsor chair maker
1970's
Yorkshire
 
Caption
Windsor chairs have been popular since the 18th Century and are usually fashioned from solid English wood. Brian Marlowe had a workshop high above Haworth where he designed and made a range of Windsor chairs using a lathe to turn the legs and back spindles.
Display Creator
REES, David Morgan
Creation Date
1970's
Location
Yorkshire
Chair repairer
REES, David Morgan
Chair repairer
1970's
Yorkshire
 
Caption
A craftsman at Taylor Brothers of Ulleskelf near Selby repairs a chair bottom using twisted and woven rushes.
Display Creator
REES, David Morgan
Creation Date
1970's
Location
Yorkshire
Ecclesiastical glazers
REES, David Morgan
Ecclesiastical glazers
1970's
Yorkshire
 
Caption
Of all the crafts that have existed since medieval times none can be as brilliant and unique as the work carried out by medieval glass painters. York today has the largest accumulated collection of ancient stained and painted glass in England. Peter Gibson of the York Glazier's trust had prime responsibility for preserving and restoring all the stained glass in York Minster and other buildings nationwide.
Display Creator
REES, David Morgan
Creation Date
1970's
Location
Yorkshire
Ecclesiastical glazers
REES, David Morgan
Ecclesiastical glazers
1970's
Yorkshire
 
Caption
Combining brilliance of beauty with reverence and mystery, the Minster is the work of scores of glazier craftsmen, most of whom were unknown. It is a complete visual commentary on glass painting over the last eight hundred years.
Display Creator
REES, David Morgan
Creation Date
1970's
Location
Yorkshire
Ecclesiastical glazers
REES, David Morgan
Ecclesiastical glazers
1970's
Yorkshire
 
Caption
A section of lead is opened out with a "lathekin" in preparation to receive the glass.
Display Creator
REES, David Morgan
Creation Date
1970's
Location
Yorkshire
General saddler
REES, David Morgan
General saddler
1970's
Yorkshire
 
Caption
Saddlery today is mostly concerned with repairs and miscellaneous leather work rather than with crafting new saddles. Saddlery for working horses on the land is a rare occurrence for a craftsman. Tom Thacker, a general saddler in the market town of Bedale, measures a leather horse collar
Display Creator
REES, David Morgan
Creation Date
1970's
Location
Yorkshire
Racing saddler
REES, David Morgan
Racing saddler
1970's
Yorkshire
 
Caption
As well as being the sport of kings, horse racing is meat and drink to many a Yorkshireman. The county abounds with race courses from the small and cosy like Thirsk to the large and hectic like York or Doncaster, home of the St Leger. Malcolm Hadfield, a self taught saddler near Malton making a saddle tree which is the frame on which the light-weight racing saddle is later built.
Display Creator
REES, David Morgan
Creation Date
1970's
Location
Yorkshire
Racing saddler
REES, David Morgan
Racing saddler
1970's
Yorkshire
 
Caption
Malcolm displays the component parts of a racing saddle. The racing saddler provides a standard of workmanship which must match the thoroughbred qualities of the animals wearing the gear he makes.
Display Creator
REES, David Morgan
Creation Date
1970's
Location
Yorkshire